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Dismuke's Hit Of The Week
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April 2008



April 24
 

 




Cottage By The MoonClick on song title to stream or right clock on folder to download
Wingy Manone And His Orchestra 
Wingy Manone, vocal                                           1936
(Bluebird B 6536 A)

It Can Happen To YouClick on song title to stream or right clock on folder to download
Wingy Manone And His Orchestra
Wingy Manone, vocal                                           1936
(Bluebird B 6536 B)
 
 

Wingy Manone was a  trumpet player from New Orleans who got his start performing on Mississippi River steamboats.  When he was a child, Manone lost his right arm in a streetcar accident.  He was nevertheless able to use his artificial arm so convincingly that many of his fans were not aware of his handicap.   By the 1930s, Manone was as well known for his jive  vocals as he was for his New Orleans style trumpet playing.    The peak of his popularity was in the late 1930s and early 1940s. 
 

- Dismuke
 

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EXTRA






This section will  present 78 rpm recordings that do not fall within the range of the vintage pop and jazz  fare that I usually  present.  Here I will feature recordings from a wide variety of eras, musical genres and nationalities as well as occasional spoken word recordings.
 
 




Youíve Got To See Mama Evíry NightClick on song title to stream or right clock on folder to download
Broadway Dance Orchestra                                              1923
(Edison 51073 R mx 8878)

Everything Is KO in KYClick on song title to stream or right clock on folder to download
Kaplanís Melodists                                                           1923
(Edison 51073 L mx 8837)
 

These selections are from an old Edison Diamond Disc record.  During the first two decades of the 20th century, the patents for the lateral (or zig zag) recording grooves found on conventional 78 rpm records were held exclusively in the United States by Victor and Columbia.  Until 1919, other companies wanting to compete in the United States record market had to use the vertical (or "hill and dale") groove process that had previously been used on cylinder records. 

Thomas Edison preferred cylinder records on grounds that they were a superior audio product as they did not have the sound degradation that occurs on disc records as the grooves get closer to the center of the record.   However,  because of the disc record's ability to feature a second side of recorded content and their more convenient storage capabilities, by 1912 the marketplace had rejected cylinder records in favor of the disc.  Edison's answer was the Diamond Disc.  The records were a quarter inch thick and weighed a full pound and featured an ultra quiet surface laminated over a wood pulp core.    The records could only be played on Edison machines.  Rather than the steel needles used for the playback of conventional records, Edison's machines were equipped with a special, permanent diamond stylus. 

Prior to the advent of electrical recording, Edison's Diamond Discs were usually superior to their competition in terms of audio fidelity.    Thomas Edison's priority and focus on technological quality over providing the sort of music and artists the public was interested in hampered the company's commercial success.  In fact,  Edison insisted on personally auditioning every recording issued by the company - despite the fact that he was almost deaf and that his 19th century musical tastes were out of line with what modern audiences wanted. 

After the lateral recording patents expired in 1919, every other label in the United States besides Edison using vertical recording grooves switched over to the more popular process.  By the early 1920s, Edison records were increasingly regarded by the record buying public as being hopelessly old fashioned and the company entered a long decline that ended when the stock market crash of 1929 forced it out of business.  In the final months of operations, Thomas Edison finally authorized the release of conventional, lateral grooved Edision records - but it was too little too late. 

Both of these recordings were made by Edison studio orchestras.  Thomas Edison disliked jazz - but there are definitely examples of it on "You've Got To See Mama Ev'ry Night."   Kaplan's Melodists was named after Dave Kaplin who was a pianist, arranger and music director for Edison's record operations. 

 - Dismuke
 

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